Dalheim Mill or also Monastery Mill

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in Dalheim

Dalheim Mill is situated in a remote forest location near the Dutch border. This mill has a confirmed history going back over 800 years. It lies by the Helpensteiner or Rothenbach brook. Coming from the direction of Wildenrath business park, the Hepensteiner brook flows into the Dahlheim mill pond; after that it is called the Rothenbach brook. This brook meanders through the valley on to Gitstapermolen mill, and from there on to Vlodrop in Roerdalen village, where it meets the Rur river (without an 'h'). It is 14 kilometres long. In the Netherlands, this brook is called the Rode Beek.

Up to the 1802 secularisation, the mill was owned by the Cistercian Order of nuns at Ophoven for around 650 years. It was purchased by Heinrich von Helpenstein in 1231 and thereby acquired by the nuns, who moved to Dalheim in around 1258. The nuns were exempt from thirlage. Due to wear and tear over time, the mill had to be rebuilt in 1775. A stone above the entrance commemorates that time. The mill was equipped with one set of millstones and an oil press and was powered by an undershot water wheel. Like all other monastic orders, the Cistercian nuns were forced to leave their monastery, and therefore also to abandon the mill. It came into private ownership during Napoleon's time. Like numerous other mill sites, this mill in the forest was a popular destination for outings and ran a summertime hospitality business even as early as the late 19th century. In the past, this place was also on the famous smugglers' route.

Opening times:
Wednesday to friday between 10:00 bis 18:00 clock.
Saturday and Su from 09:00 bis 19:00 clock. open

November to February on Saturday and Sunday from 09:00 am from 18:00 clock.

Adress: Mühlenstraße 15, 41844 Wegberg-Dalheim, Phone: +49 (0)2436-382488

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